ENGINES OF CREATION BOOK

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Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology is a molecular nanotechnology book written by K. Eric Drexler with a foreword by Marvin Minsky. Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology (Anchor Library of Browse our editors' picks for the best books of the month in fiction, nonfiction. Start by marking “Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology” as Want to Read: Drexler goes in to depth on explaining the great potential in nano tech, backing his predictions up with numerous pages of notes and references. K. Eric Drexler, Ph.D., is a researcher and.


Engines Of Creation Book

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K. Eric Drexler's Engines of Creation is an enormously original book about the consequences of new technologies. It is ambitious and imaginative and, best of all. Unique for both its style and substance, the book is today recognized as the seminal Originally published in , K. Eric Drexler's Engines of Creation laid the. Anchor Books, Translations: 创造的发动机 · Engins de création: L' avènement des nanotechnologies See also: Engines of Creation

In ihrem komplexen Zusammenspiel mutieren sie, von selbst evolvierend, weiter und bringen einen ungemeinen Artenreichtum hervor.

Der Nanotechnologie sind keine Grenzen gesetzt. Ein Vergleich mit dem Feuer veranschaulicht die Potentiale. Mit der Nanotechnologie sind wir an diesem Beginn.

Etwa ein Weltraumlift, der zuerst zum Bau von Orbitalstationen genutzt benutzt wird. Je mehr Lifte und Stationen entstehen, desto mehr Material kann direkt weiter ins All geschickt werden. Die Kolonialisierung kann exponentiell immer schneller voran schreiten.

Die Raumfahrt wird durch die neuen Werkstoffe erst realistisch. Sie werden denn Sinn einer solch ineffektiven Massenproduktion nicht verstehen. In Kombination mit einem alles verbindenden Internet kann von der Entstehung eines Gaiaorganismus gesprochen werden. Dass man mit ihrer Programmierung die Gesetze von Raum und Zeit manipulieren kann. Vielleicht beginnen auf diese Art und Weise Universen zu entstehen. Und dann kommt es wie bei Software oder dem Internet zu einer Datenexplosion.

View all 6 comments. Aug 31, Nick Wellings rated it really liked it. Beautifully bonkers, Drexler's optimistic, visionary tract seems absurdly far fetched nowadays.

But, that is most likely because the end result - tiny self replicating machines, structures made of pure diamond, cheap energy and creation, bootstrapping and plenitude, luxury and material wealth for all - would be a kind of utopia.

Nevertheless, given some hundreds of years, it may well happen that a world like his will emerge, nanotechnology or no. Certainly, we seem to be approaching limits ever Beautifully bonkers, Drexler's optimistic, visionary tract seems absurdly far fetched nowadays.

Certainly, we seem to be approaching limits ever smaller, yet these are till titanically more vast than the nanoscale. If nothing else Engines of Creation is a paen to engineering and material science, soteriological hymn to technology, perhaps as response to 80s politics, perhaps as personal obsession for Drexler, perhaps as unique expression of a scientist's wish to do moral good by providing the conceptual bedrock for creation of material abundance and freedom from care and pain and want.

What greater motive than the promise of curing all disease? Meantime, we - groping vainly after distant hope - can only dream of their future. If it is anything like Drexler's dream, they might count themselves lucky as they judge us fools for wanting without chance of having.

May 15, Brent rated it liked it Shelves: An interesting early look at nanotech. Bottom line summary: Nanotechnology is coming.

It will either save us or destroy us. Research for WIP. Jan 31, Rowland rated it it was amazing Shelves: Engines of Creations is a really exciting book about the possibility of a fantastic future. While nanotechnology is the main part of the book, Drexler talks about Artificial Intelligence AI , colonisation of space, information management, and an extended almost immortal life.

The book can be very technical at times as the author begins by explaining how DNA Engines of Creations is a really exciting book about the possibility of a fantastic future. The book can be very technical at times as the author begins by explaining how DNA is a nanomachine and how it encodes and produces every living thing.

Engines of Creation 2.0: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology

He uses this as a model for man to design DNA like machines and extends this to nanomachines not based on building proteins but building non-organic machines. Large parts of the book talk about the steps that need to be taken in order to ensure that the technology is produced with appropriate safeguards in place both physical and political.

The book was published in when html and the web was still being developed. Towards the end of the book there is a chapter on information. He basically explains the web as it is now. The ideas in this book are used extensively in almost every modern sci-fi book or movie out there. I read this volume 20 years ago. I am still haunted by all its implications.

Nanotechnology was still largely theoretical when I first read the book and I was somewhat incredulous over some of the caveats proferred by Dr. The author gives us an amazing overview of the possibilities in nanotech: Imagine "growing a jet engine from a brew of tiny robots in solution. As you watch, the brew quickly morphs into a solid piece of complicated equipment. I was reminded of Arthur C Clarke's 3rd la I read this volume 20 years ago. I was reminded of Arthur C Clarke's 3rd law of technology: Drexler warns of us his "Grey Goo" hypothesis: That a nano robot designed to consume ALL organic matter it comes into contact with and create other identical bots in the process.

Such a nightmare scenario would mean the end of all life on the planet in very short order. Scary shit! Even after 20 years, this book is a timely must-read for any engaged citizen.

View 1 comment. Jun 16, Ned Hanlon rated it liked it. This is a delightfully ambitious and optimistic view, laying forth a vision of the future and casually brushing a side any existential if not apocolyptic! Kurzweil just adds more ego and pictures which are both lots of fun! Of the two I think I would suggest the Kurzweil, primarily because it was written more recently a This is a delightfully ambitious and optimistic view, laying forth a vision of the future and casually brushing a side any existential if not apocolyptic!

Of the two I think I would suggest the Kurzweil, primarily because it was written more recently and therefore has a more up-to-date grasp of current technologies.

Sep 05, Nasreddin rated it really liked it. This book lies somewhere between science fiction and non-fiction. It is quite intriguing though, how nanotechnology, with its root in bio-tech, can ideally make what we've seen on Star Trek: The Next Generation become a reality.

Drexler goes in to depth on explaining the great potential in nano tech, backing his predictions up with numerous pages of notes and references. The part at the end with the text about Hyperspeech, was admittedly amusing given our age now with the internet, and I also sh This book lies somewhere between science fiction and non-fiction.

The part at the end with the text about Hyperspeech, was admittedly amusing given our age now with the internet, and I also shook my head at some of the phrases with the "leading force" but one has to remember that he wrote the book while the Soviet Union still existed. All in all, after reading the book I looked up articles on Nanotechnology and was quite happy to see that is indeed a very serious research.

Who knows, we might yet end up on our version of the "Enterprise" and explore new worlds. Oct 07, David rated it liked it. I was wild about this book when I read it, but my current understanding is that it has been demonstrated to be false, the technology the book predicts violates quantum mechanics, or so I have read.

That said, the three star rating is some kind of average between my original and current thoughts about the book. Jul 26, Scott Spencer rated it really liked it. Hard to believe that this book is so old, but the predictions are dead on in terms of AI, nanotech, and the internet. I don't agree that assemblers will be something that can be caged and regulated as the author claims.

Technology has changed since this book was written, but the concepts of how his technology will impact our society are timeless. Jan 30, Danilo rated it really liked it. While most of changes he predicted still aren't even close suggesting one could really guess when revolution's around the corner , most of topics provide and interesting take on what nanobots can accomplish.

Aug 12, Nadim rated it really liked it. A very hopeful book. Reminded me of the 's when we expected technology would solve all future woes. Luckily, he threw in that prediction about I won't spoil it for you. Dec 30, Faith rated it it was amazing Shelves: I want a book like this for every subject I am interested in.

Sep 25, Ibiblion rated it liked it. The chapter of hypertext seems too optimistic by nowadays, but nanotechnology is exciting anyway. Jul 13, Aman Kumar rated it it was amazing Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It was amazing book. Mar 02, V K rated it liked it.

Very thorough, some progressive content considering when it was written and fairly accessible for someone who is not at all from a technical background.

Mar 23, John Grange rated it really liked it. Despite K. Eric Drexler writing this book all the way back in the mid 's, his work is still futurism's magnum opus. Somehow, the author very cleverly captured the essence of distant technology and made it feel so attainable and rational. His writing seeps with optimism, which can undermine credibility, but in this instance, that optimism has a wonderful charm.

Reading a book like this in is extra fascinating because it was written almost 30 years ago and made some bold predictions about Despite K. Reading a book like this in is extra fascinating because it was written almost 30 years ago and made some bold predictions about the future we live in now. I think Mr. Drexler was extraordinarily prescient on many things and overly optimistic, if not naive, about others. Today, he would likely be very impressed by our technological capabilities with our powerful micro chips and global internet, but also maybe slightly underwhelmed by our progress in biotechnology and genetics.

We're far more advanced but not institutionally. My favorite part of the book was the section on hypertext. Reading that passage 30 years later in a world of ubiquitous and pervasive internet connectivity, was a real testament to our progress.

His predictions about 'hypertext', the internet, seemed so quaint. Unfortunately, in his portrait of hypertext perfection he didn't predict internet trolling, toxic comments sections, and expansive amounts of useless content.

Everything he predicted about the internet ended up coming to fruition but his predictions didn't go far enough. Today's internet is far larger, far more dynamic, far more connected, than he imagined.

If Drexler's predictions about the internet are a guide then our nanomolecular future will be bright. His premise is that nature has proven the feasibility of molecular machines, humans have proven the feasibility of constructing very small machines.

So our natural technological progression would point to a future of synthetic molecular machines and replicators that transform humanity. It's as fasninating as it sounds and the author paints the most vivid and exciting picture of humanity's future.

The book spends a lot of time discussing the risks of the nanotechnology revolution along with motigation strategies. I find this area much less interesting outside of specific technical solutions like Active Shields.

Predicting the future of technology can be fun and almost whimsical. Predicting future behavior of a bureaucracy is much less interesting. We don't know what future governments will look like or the ethos of their constituents. Predicting global order and dynamics along with governmental cooperation and alliances is much more pernicious than predicting technical or scientific advances.

I say as a devout futurist that this book is one of the best. In our time we are on the precipus of powerful technical AI and people like the author and books like these are why we're here. The future holds great promise and we need individuals like Mr. Drexler to tell the story and help guide the advance.

Nov 24, Bradley King-Spooner rated it it was amazing. I require an exclamation. Give me a second Nope, too many connotations. Bah, presumptuous. Stars above? Getting there.

Moral saints? Too mundane. Screw it, I'm making a new one: As Drexler points out at the end of this book, his aim is not to promote nanotechnology, but to "promote understanding of nanotechnology and its consequences". This was relayed exceptionally well, to me at least other readers seem to have misunderstood , as he analyses, elaborates upon, and ul I require an exclamation. This was relayed exceptionally well, to me at least other readers seem to have misunderstood , as he analyses, elaborates upon, and ultimately offers in considerable detail the potentials of this forthcoming technology.

The concept needs no promoting to me; I am - as the metaphor goes - a member of the choir, but the details of what it might or might not entail, and in such detail as given here, is a gemstone in this personal research venture of mine.

That said, this is a specialised book, covering a particular subject. Ergo, unless you - like me - have an interest in nanotechnology beyond such infamous fictional instances as Steven Armstrong's "Nanomachines, son.

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It is insightful, and educational in a manner most textbooks can only dream of, but unless you are already engaged on this particular path, I would sooner ask you to walk a gravel footpath though I may throw you some shoes if I like you. There is no fiction here, no plot, no pacing, no characterisation; none of the lovely things I would either praise or lambaste in most books. There is only sound speculation, written by someone who knows exactly what he is talking about.

As a first-timer to nonfiction reads, I find this book cold, but this must be taken with what I have already said, and besides, I like the cold. I consider myself fortunate to have read this book, and will no doubt keep it on-hand for a long time to come.

Speculation from the realworld has never before inspired me so. Jan 02, Jake rated it it was amazing. This is the masterpiece of physics ideas that: Such tyranny could be eternal, and could be in your own mind, without even the ability t This is the masterpiece of physics ideas that: Such tyranny could be eternal, and could be in your own mind, without even the ability to commit suicide to end it.

This book explores the darkest ideas of radical "leading force technology. And did a lot of other things too. It's required reading for serious thinkers. It should be considered required reading for libertarian philosophers. It's free online, but sending Eric Drexler a royalty commission is worthwhile, too. This is one of the books that "started it all. Oct 17, 5dd rated it it was amazing Shelves: An introduction to one of the most brilliant, creative and exciting ideas that mankind has ever had.

This book offers a non-technical description of the next technological revolution. Feynman was the first to introduce the idea, but it was Drexler that really ran with it. Drexler is the recognized father of nanotechnology, and humanity doesn't yet realize how much they owe him. Drexler's PhD on nanotechnology MIT, was the first ever awarded on the topic for the simple reason that n An introduction to one of the most brilliant, creative and exciting ideas that mankind has ever had.

Drexler's PhD on nanotechnology MIT, was the first ever awarded on the topic for the simple reason that nobody else had ever thought about it with such depth and clarity. Even today, the vast majority of the world's scientists and engineers are completely unaware of the magnitude of technological advancement that is available to us through development of ideas that Drexler presented more than 20 years ago.

May 13, Marco Santini rated it it was amazing. This is an epoch making book, no doubt, with a strong inspirational content. Almost 30 years later Eric Drexler wrote this book about molecular nanotechnology with a foreword by the AI scientist Marvin Minsky.

How can the whole Li This is an epoch making book, no doubt, with a strong inspirational content.

Engines of creation

How can the whole Library of Congress fit on a chip the size of a sugar cube? Hypertext, life extension, space colonization, exponential growth are other topics of a book overflowing our mind with technological breakthroughs whose implications can now be imagined only up to a limited extent.

Feb 06, Hieu Cao rated it really liked it. This book is really thought-provoking. It raises the question of how we should 'foresight' the future. Drexler points out that our perceptions of technology are inert. If we don't transform our institutions, culture, and perceptions to be in pace with the development of technology, technology may spin out of our control. In the book, Drexler uses nanotechnology to illustrate possibilities and dangers of technological development.

His vision about assemblers and replicators may be far-fetched but This book is really thought-provoking. If the basic building blocks of life have similar underlying principles of functioning as synthetic organisms, there must be a connection.

A still to be found context between artificially produced intelligence and biological intelligence in the form of molecular machines. Both seem to be based on entirely simple basic instructions and rules. In their elaborate interplay, they mutate, evolving by themselves, and bring forth immense biodiversity. There are no limits to nanotechnology.

A comparison with the fire illustrates the potentials. Man learned from many generations to use it for himself. The power of energy in the form of weapons, engines, machines, power plants, etc. With nanotechnology, we are at this beginning. We are running around hooting with torches, wallowing in our genius and maybe triggering one or the other, hopefully, non-devastating wildfire gray goo.

If you add , or even years and you include cooperation with AI and genetic engineering, nothing is impossible. For example, a spacelift that is first used to build orbital stations. The more lifts and stations are created, the more material can be sent directly into space. All this without the current restriction to primitive, chemically powered rockets. Colonization can progress exponentially faster and faster.

Space travel is only realistic thanks to the new materials. An effective cure and therapy of several diseases and the solution of problems of the environment, scarcity, production bottlenecks, food production, etc. If primitive, visible robots already do so much work, invisible helpers can do much more. Not only can they maintain and repair their vast archaic predecessors, but they can also modify themselves.

One will no longer need a production line with fully automated robots, where everything from delivery to shipping is done without people.

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This will be like the stone age for our heirs in the Nano Age. They will not understand the meaning or even sense of such ineffective mass production. Because by self-assembly and initial support by 3D printers and other machines, the robots will be able to produce everything from the primary materials provided. No extra waste of energy or long transport paths will be necessary if everything can be built on demand within a short time.

The most significant potential unfolds when nanotechnology and biotechnology are coordinated. For example, when gene therapy, a newly developed vaccine, etc. When new genetic engineered forms of life restore nature while nanobots assist them. The fusion of the benefits of both natural and human technologies will make cyborgs and transhumanist ideas a reality.

In combination with an interconnecting future Internet, one can speak of the emergence of a Gaia organism.

Engines of creation

The effects on quantum computers and computing power will make us look like antique bean counters with abacuses. Like the miniaturization and Moore's Law in the previous development, the steady improvement in the smaller and smaller machines will scratch on the building blocks and layers of reality. There are no limits to successive reduction. We know too little that we could rule that out. For example, that the robots are built up to the size of the quantum plane or what lies underneath.

This could open the door to a scenario in which the robots can fumble around on the foundations of reality. That one can manipulate the laws of space and time with their programming. That would put software engineers in the status of gods. As postulated by the incredibly awesome simulation hypothesis, the robots could then be the executing programming instances.

And the smallest components of reality the source code of life. And we computer programs in an existence operated by some higher entity. Maybe in this way, universes begin to emerge. When nanorobots become quantum robots and eventually transform into something beyond the still impossible to enter and therefore forbidden zones. And then it comes to a data explosion as with software or the Internet. Except that out of the source code, programs and algorithms instead of images, videos, and words universes, dimensions, multiverses, and parallel universes are formed.

Ab Weltraumlift, Nanobots oder Quantencomputer. Setzt ein Alterungsprozess ein, wird er von den emsigen Helfern umgekehrt. Um den Heilungsprozess zu beschleunigen, transportiert ein anderes Modell von Robotern pharmazeutische Wirkstoffe direkt zur Wunde.

Science Fiction?Pass it on! Reading it could be a matter of life or death to you. Of the two I think I would suggest the Kurzweil, primarily because it was written more recently and therefore has a more up-to-date grasp of current technologies.

Predicting future behavior of a bureaucracy is much less interesting. It will either save us or destroy us. This is a delightfully ambitious and optimistic view, laying forth a vision of the future and casually brushing a side any existential if not apocolyptic! Join Reader Rewards and earn points when you download this book from your favorite retailer.

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